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think so, but yeah, after a year or less after columbine, "the new york times" asked me to do a reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i got in trouble for doing so much but i wanted to get this right. once i sent those things off, or better
a conversationalist and became a striking young woman then she had her debut in new york. she came back a few years later. nothing could out do the flurry of excitement that hetty encountered the fall of 1860. this city shimmered with the news as the prince of wales was coming. a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society trimmed their moustaches women spent hours and at 9:00 p.m. friday october 12th couples who had paid $10 apiece arrived at the academy of music. men with white ties and women with hoopskirt its with brocade, sat tin, lead tools, gave special nods to precisely at 10:00 p.m. the orchestra played god save the queen and the small prints stepped into the room. nearly 3,000 of new york's finest citizens rushed to meet him and with the rash the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously the aghast rushed to follow they had lobster salad, pat day and filled glasses with champagne. at 2:00 with their dance floor fixed eager females waited their turn for a dance and finally the young woman was tapped. stunning in her low cut white gown with pink and her arms covered wit
to be here. as i tell my history students at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they want to choke me the past is a foreign country. we can visit, try to learn the customs and the white smith the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much in the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy as it is this time around. first there are people you have to talk to. and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of committees, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know they don't know at all. the difficulty is that it is not always easy to establish to construct the path that is so close to us and yet this is what historians have to do. our job i
and then the irish. they came in fantastic numbers into new york, philadelphia, boston and so on. and albany. albany had so many irish that they couldn't handle it during the famine, and they stopped it. to close our borders and would not let any more people in. they were so many people coming into the city. eventually the irish became dominant in the 19th century in numbers. in 1875 cents as i think showed one in six all iranians was born in ireland. add to this the politics that albany was always a political city, even in dutch colonizati colonization, and in the time of the english, likewise when we have the revolution. waters, schemers, drafters of the constitution gathering in albany, franklin's albany planet union. and so, so it went through the years. one of the great politicians of all time in this state come in this country, was the mayor of albany. he had an interrupted success from the time he was elected 1942 until he died in hospital in 1983, 11 terms uninterrupted, and that's the longest running mayor of any city in the united states, and he was very proud of that. he was part of this
. the sisters were the littlefield sisters. they're from upstate new york near troy, and the first sister to come was 20 years old at the time. she came in 1866, and she had been visiting some cousins who lived in chesterfield just north of williamsburg. and they hold told her skinner was looking for new workers. >> e e e applied, got the job and became an expert spooler. and that meant she worked in the finishing section of the mill. she would wind it on the actual spools that would go to market. it was a job that required tremendous skill because you couldn't damage the silk whatsoever. this was the silk that was going to be sold. she was fantastic at it. and another sister followed her, named francis, and this is what often happened. one sister worked in the mill, she would send word to her other sisters or siblings and say apply for a job, you know, come join me. and so within this mill community you had a number of siblings working together. it was very much a family environment. the third sister to come work for skinner was ellen littlefield. now, ellen outlasted both of her sisters
about jefferson to give you two sides of him very quickly. matthew davis, an office seeker from new york goes to monticello to fit in the city even now, travels to lobby for the job, he was a burr loyalist. jefferson, not so much a loyalist as we know. i should quickly add one of these i say to my hamiltonian friends is at least my guy didn't get shot in jersey. [laughter] among the founders to have sent e-mails is alexander hamilton what thomas jefferson and one to get on the record and then move on if he's sitting there pleading his case and jefferson is looking sort of blow seng in that vaguely charming we had. he's not like fdr that you can leave. anyone that left his company thought he agreed with them. it's to get for the moment and not such a great way to get through the day as it turns out to he is my contact with davis and goes, grabs the fly it begins pulling apart. davis begins to realize that man of for quite as well as he hoped. a second story. there you have the man that can snap a fly, pulled apart and ferociously focused when he needs to be to read often making you thinki
corp. in new york or listen to don imus. he had a ted kennedy impersonator and sounded just like this. so i listened to the message and after listening to it the second and third time, i realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was end on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of red in potato chips. we talked for three, four hours. but i remember saying over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i'm an historian and i'm going to find stuff
is stop reading the new york times. [laughter] much more than it used 210 or even -- >> my commentary. >> there is a sort of classic effort to say what is important and what is unimportant in accordance with an ideological schemes. you know, i don't think there's an answer to this, and it's very hard to get people to jump out of that sort of in the case of the times to liberal left, the view of the world. except over a long amount of time by pointing out to cognitive dissidence and disrupted -- discrepancies. i guess it's easier now in the sense that the state department, i remember work stopped at 630 to watch cronkite and broke off. their interpretation of the news was critical for the u.s. government. likewise, time and newsweek. i mean, you now have -- pardon me. you now have many more news broadcasts and we have the internet. so if we could just get rid of the new york times, the problem would be about 25 percent salt. i actually am serious about that because of its influence on media elites throughout the country who look at it to determine how to understand the world. >> please
house would be burn down. the tea boycott spread to other cities, down the coast to new york, philadelphia, charleston, and other ports. this was the original tea party movement. it was not patriotic. it was not pretty or glorious. the furry climaxed thursday, december 16th, 1773, just before kris christmas, and the dumping of a million dollars worth of british tea. the people who dumped them amounted to about six or seven dozen men, nobody knows exactly how many were there. it was dark. many disguised themselves as indians. ironically, the white colonist who slaughtered indians on site, disguised themselves as indians baa they regarded them as a symbol of freedom. this unleashed a social, political, and economic upheaval they would never again be able to control. the tea party provoked a reign of terror in boston and other american cities with american inflicting unimaginable bar bareties on each other. they dumped ships, boston staged a second tea party a few months after the first one. the mobs showed no dissent, burning homes of anyone they suspected of favoring british r
or pakistani sources, but it's according to john burns of the new "new york times" that places the corruption at $2 billion to $3 billion. >> so you don't approve? >> i wouldn't vote for him, no. [laughter] >> this, of course, has been the struggle and the tragedy of pakistan over a long period of time that when something like democratic elections occur, the sighfullian leaderships that take office fail the mandate that brought them there, and they often fail in space that's pinched and constrained by the military and the intelligent purposes. we were talking before we came out that the army's out putting tv ads up bragging about the performance in the flood as if it's something they -- out of the ordinary that an army would do. >> yes. >> so are we in a phase that's going to feel repetitious? lead to another military intervention? is there an alternative future in your estimation? >> well, you know, there's a nightmare merry-go-round you see in pakistani poll sick -- politics. heafter he was made president -- we don't call them elections, we call them selections. the same selections that bro
where i had been rubbing key enough to -- lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from a new york publisher to write a book. it was, you know, a dream come true. and in mexico city by november of 1997 i had crossed the deadline, and i didn't have a word written. and i was broke. and i called the only friend that i could count on that, at that point because my lifestyle had led me to destroy a lot of my personal relationships. i called a performance artist from costa rica everybody has a one of the first things i saw. i found myself driven to go further and further out. we were in the village of joshua tree which is right on the edge of a beautiful national park. if you've ever been there, you know u2's album at least. well, i wanted to go further out. there is something existential that was driving me further and further out into the nothing, the big empty as they say about the desert. and also because the further out you went, the rents got cheaper and cheaper and cheaper. so i was paying $275 a month for a two-bedroom house with five acres of land on t
separatists among the federalists in new england and new york a wanted to secede from the union and let the south do whatever it wants to do. well, that would have been a de trail by the 500,000 slaves with no hope of freedom. i feel that he would calmed those extremists down but he had the ear of the moderate federalists like those on the supreme court especially john marshall who was opposing slavery and wanted to work to end slavery. monroe wanted to work to end slavery. patrick henry, who was an antifederalist republican to the left wanted to work and was working with quaker leaders to find a solution to this problem. so i think he could have united the people of goodwill to address this problem whereas that polarized the nation and was the beginning of polarization that would never end until the civil war. >> this is reversed time travel, if we could bring john quincy adams to our day, what do you think he would like and not like america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas to dictate to other societies the kind of societies they have to have. when he had the oppor
federalists in new england and new york to succeed from the union and let the south do whatever it wants to do. that would've been a betrayal. by then, 500,000 slaves with no hope of freedom. he i think would've called those extremists don't, but more important he had the year of the moderate federalists, like those on the supreme court, especially john marshall who was although a virginian, oppose slavery and wanted to work to end slavery. then i wanted to work to end slavery. patrick honey, who is an anti-federalist in our two republican to the left wanted to work and was working with quaker leaders to try to find some solution to the slavery problem. so i think with so many come he could have united the people with goodwill to address this problem, whereas jackson polarize the nation and is the beginning of polarization that would never end to the civil war. >> one more question to me and this is a reverse time travel question. if we could bring john quincy adams to our day, what do you think you would like and not like about america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas, it
mary, daughter of railroad tycoon eh harriman, who headed the eugenics record office in new york, saying quote, the pfizer team is going to be a purifying conflagration one day, unquote. his prophecy would come true only 20 years later at a cost of millions. fairly easy for governments to manipulate public health, medicines and doctors for purposes of quote family planning. this soon led into policies about colonial possessions and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the progress is a view of educated elite. and by their definitions, were close to quote life unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony of this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold ame
just in a conversation -- i contributed to a conference at the united nations in new york, one of these peace conferences, dialogue of cultures, dialogue of religions and so on and so forth. shortly after the film was made by some boys in the united states, and this, of course, again -- yet again, led to killingings all over the world. everybody battening down their hatches. and the question i ask myself, and again the sort of question we ask, what contributed to this? why is it that any one religion considers that it is so sack mikhail saakashvili crow sank, it conclude cannot be commented on in sing, any publication is in the public domain and is subject to public commentary, and for any religion to claim sanctity, it's a continuation of this same mentality that denigrated other religions in their time, but now has assumed universal and diabolical proportions. some borished do it for in denmark splashes the images of the prophet muhammad, and somebody in nye -- nigeria, this kind of -- this level of intolerance has become -- seems to have become accentable... acceptable. so o
, in new york, where i'm from or another state just to, but there are complications in terms of depending on what said you then end up living in. >> host: i understand, but it's not legal where you live. the question is in places like canada or netherlands, you know, for a number of years now, and no more than 10% of people enter legal unions. >> guest: i think that's partly because in many cases, couples have already cobbled together certain limited legal structures to the extent that they can. mark and i have a big expensive binder at home, and people have done that. there's questions about how all of that get affected. i think that's partly because, as you know, given your work over the last several decades, a marriage culture takes time to build, and, you know, when i startedded working on this issue back in the early -- when i started working on gay rights issues back in the early 1990s, marriage was not on the radar. it was not until the mid-90s with hawaii that we talked about it in a serious way, and my friend, you know him well, evan wilson, was working on this, but when evan sta
the 92nd in new york. i had one, and the other person who had won was an person. she was supposed to be writing a book on the classics, and i was supposed to be writing a book about plagiarism. and she was actually in her room writing poems and i was trying to become a novelist. so we weren't very good novelist for the money that they expended on us. [laughter] we were grateful for them. i am very pleased to have been invited here this afternoon. i confess that i owe some miscellaneous deaths as an author and a reader. most of them are cautionary, i guess. which is presumptuous to begin with. a few of them may be cranky. and i suppose all of them, and their weight, are of nostalgia, without trying to be trusted to the past. my father was holding loves overhears 14 years old in 1920. he had to go to work after the death of his father. it was 50 years after that in 1978 that had my first article accepted for publication. i was so excited that i sent him a copy. this man left school at 14, and again, this is from that letter. i wish i could put into words how much i enjoyed seeing th
an editorial in the "new york times" a couple weeks ago, and it had to do with morality's ability to behind -- bind and blind, and, you know, it binds people, you believe in, you know, you believe in whatever you believe in, abortion one way or the other or whatever you believe about entitlements or whatever you believe about global warming, but you're incapable of seeing the other side at all, that there might be any validity outside. you take that into congress, and if both sides just sit there, they won't bend or see the other side's point of view, nothing happens. the anger that comes out of that, i mean, a lot of people are just running around so angry because they just have to -- well, this is what i think. this is -- there's no other way other than my way. >> it's funny, i think reading, particularly reading about other people's lives -- >> absolutely. >> creating tolerance as well. >> absolutely, absolutely. that's the great thing about books right now more than any other medium that we have. a television -- a television's getting better, interestingly, movies, i mean, it's a lot of
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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